Natural Vase: Eggshell Spring Floral

With winter well behind us, it's time to start thinking spring. Nothing welcomes the colors of spring into your home the way fresh flowers do. The vibrant colors add cheer and fun to your decor. Arranging your flowers in a new and unique way can be a challenge. Today we are taking advantage of nature's bounty as a vessel for our blooms.

Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest

Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest

This floral project is super simple, but will require a little planning up front. You will need to start breaking your eggs a little differently until you have a dozen or so. For me, that only takes a week, but if you eat eggs less often you may want to start earlier or plan a dish or two that requires plenty of eggs, like a strata or frittata.

The result is charming and whimsical, and perfect for a low-lying arrangement. It works great for an end table under a lamp, on a bedside table, or as part of your brunch centerpiece.

savour... design eggs-ecution

Eggshell Spring Floral

Before you start:

We used brown eggs for our display because, well, that's what we have. However, you could use white eggs with equal success.

Although we have a ceramic egg crate in our display, this would also be cute done in a clear egg container with the top flap cut off. For a more rustic look, a pressed paper crate could work, as well. 

If you want a simpler look, consider 12 of the same bloom (tulips would be nice) and a leaf or two sticking out of each egg shell.

The materials:

  • Egg crate or tray
  • Dozen egg shells with just the tops removed
  • Adhesive putty (poster putty)
  • Spring bouquet
  • scissors or gardening shears
  • water
Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest

Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest

The steps:

  1. Use the side of a spoon to crack into the egg while rotating it, making a circle at the top about 1 inch in diameter. Remove the circle and any stray pieces of shell that have broken off. Remove the egg and use as usual. Rinse the inside of the shell with water and invert to drain and dry. Repeat until you have 12 empty shells. Note: you may want a few extra just in case there is some breakage during assembly.
  2. Stretch and knead a small amount of adhesive putty (baby pea sized) to activate it. Place the putty on the very bottom of an egg shell and press gently. Place the egg shell in the crate and secure it by placing your finger inside the shell and pressing gently while twisting the egg shell. Repeat until all crate is full.
  3. Fill each egg shell 3/4 full with water (dissolve flower food in water in advance, if desired).
  4. Cut stems short enough to have flowers cover the jagged top of the egg shells. Vary the height of some of the stems and cover the tops of the same egg shells with greenery. Randomly insert stems of smaller, textural flowers for interest.
Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest

Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest

Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest

Eggshell Spring Floral by Sam Henderson of Today's Nest